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Brexit and the growth of the slow fashion movement

Disorder handmade Silk Scarf

In light of Brexit, I have chosen to revisit a few post I wrote a few years ago April 16th 2012 to be exact. Believe me things haven't improved a great deal, our balance of payment is still growing the wrong way, but the growth of the slow fashion movement is showing green shoots. p>



How to make the Best Denim Jacket, in Britain: The trials and tribulations of being an Independent Fashion Brand, in Britain today.

Earlier this year the designers’ (the crazy fools) at Disorder Brand, set themselves the task of designing and making a pair of denim jeans exclusively made and designed in Great Britain. Little did they know what a mammoth job they were taking on, and how such a simple task was to highlight the extent to which ‘the parasitic, profit at any cost approach to fast fashion’, by the British high street, had blighted British Garment Manufacturers.

In line with Disorder’s anti-blanding, anti-branding principles and their view towards the unethical way that the high street does business; we wanted to keep our production local, and simply make a high quality, limited edition pair of denims and maybe a denim jacket.  How difficult could it be?

As it turned out virtually impossible! We didn’t realise the difficulty of this task until we had already embarked on a traumatic, arduous, and largely fruitless journey. Time and Time again we were faced with the same reply, ‘we no longer manufacture here, let alone denim, you will have to go abroad’. “Try Turkey, try China anywhere but here. We thought to ourselves, this is crazy, how can a country, and a region famed for manufacturing worldwide, not make anything anymore. There must be someone in the midlands that makes denim!

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Disorder makes costumes for Zero by Humanhood

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 13 October 2016 09:48:19 Europe/London

Zero by Humanhood featuring Costumes by Disorder

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Art Meets Fashion.....Literally

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 22 September 2016 16:43:37 Europe/London

ART MEETS FASHION..... LITERALLY 

We are all about the ART here at Disorder Boutique. Of all descriptions and disciplines. For many years the artwork of Mark Howard, Director and designer at Disorder, has been displayed around the walls and fixtures of this eclectic store, also featured on the casual wear sold there.

In recent months this 'Underground Gallery' experience has gone next level, with more and more regular and newer customers commissioning work from mark; Most popularly of Icons of the modern age, Jimi Hendrix, Prince, Muhammad Ali to name a few. The high powered graphics featured on T-shirts and hoodies have become collectible items in their own right and if you are lucky you may just happen upon a hand stained, multi colour one - off tee.

A new collection has now arrived - Disorder's new 'Art Scarves'.......

Disorder Silk Scarf

The Art Scarfs are made from silk/bamboo viscose and cashmere and then printed with some of Disorders most popular paintings, some you can see in the store. They have been the surprise hit of the summer, with Instagram 'Likes' doubling for photos featuring them. The colour mix enables a mix and match for any item in your wardrobe and the size/shape makes them so versatile for wearing: Sarong? Halter top? Turban?

Disorder Cashmere Scarf

They have been so popular a second run had to be ordered pronto. 50% of customers are purchasing as gifts, especially stressed husbands/ boyfriends looking for a last minute present. And some of our more adventurous male customers have purchased for themselves.  More recently, Legendary Birmingham band 'Fuzzbox' came along to Disorder for ideas on outfits and styling for their up coming UK tour..... And promptly fell in love. Featured on a stage near you soon. Check out the full range at Disorder Boutique, Needless Alley, Birmingham.

Disorder Silk Scarf

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Disorderly Heritage

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Wednesday, 14 September 2016 18:01:30 Europe/London

Disorderly Heritage

Painting of Joseph Chamberlain by Mark Howard, designer at Disorder

Jason Gelder has been collecting memorabilia on The Rt, Hon, Joseph Chamberlain MP for 16 Years. It all began inquisitively enough when purchasing a random piece at a postcard fair. "I'd always been interested in modern history and in particular Victorian times, but when I saw the image I just thought he looked an interesting and foreboding character and wanted to find out more about him. This interest turned into a passion for a collection that grew and grew and is now exhibited at Highbury Hall, Home of Chamberlain, twice a year. Jason wanted something special to add to his collection this year and approached Mark Howard, artist in residenc at Disorder, after seeing Marks paintings of historical and Iconic figures. It was to be a portrait of the man in a modern style, not an easy undertaking for any artist; The two characteristics that stand out in any image of Chamberlain are the monocle and the orchid, which he wore fresh, every day and grew in the greenhouses adjacent to the hall. So, an image was chosen and the painting commissioned from Mark and then framed professionally, so that it could be added to the collection and was unveiled in Mr. Chamberlains' very own house on 11th September 2016 with Francis Chamberlain, Joseph's Great, Great Grandson in attendance to unveil. Mark Howard, Director and designer at Disorder Boutique has seen a sharp increase in commissions of paintings of Iconic and recognisable figures, over the past year, although this recent portrait would no doubt be one of the most historical and most notable figures connected to the city where Disorder is based. His portraits take modern art technique and colouring, whilst still achieving a distinctly strong essence of the subjects character. Jason has tirelessly exhibited at Highbury Hall for many years, always on a voluntary basis, as his collection has gathered in size and detail. It would be interesting if a film maker or museum would take his knowledge and passion (He has even written a short book) and put it to some use in recognising a man who was so instrumental in developing Birmingham into what it is today - But for now - They made the news!! See the segment from BBC Midlands today programme here

 

 

 

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Order from Disorder

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Sunday, 15 May 2016 14:56:36 Europe/London

Just came across this really cool editorial/ interview of Disorder, it is a good read,nice to see things from a different perspective sometimes. We all get so wrapped up with what we are working on we can't see the wood for the trees..

ORDER FROM DISORDER written by Victoria Halliden 29th April 2016

Imagine you could up your expectations when it comes to shopping, forget the high-street and its penchant speed and focus on experience instead. Where would such a directive take you? Vogue magazine is betting it would be Disorder boutique, stating “if there was a list for the world’s best independent boutiques, Disorder would surely be on it”.

Disorder, in Birmingham, is the antidote for fast-fashion, an art gallery and a creative hub all fusing to create a fashion emporium for men and women. It’s as much about the visual treat as it is about the clothes, forget shopping as you know it, Disorder seeks to offer an experience for all who enter. That experience is so on-point that The Guardian cite it as “one of the top five reasons to visit the city”.

If we try and stay focused on the clothing (and, trust me when I say it’s hard to separate the blend of art and apparel as the two seem to exist together as one entity) you’ll see that Disorder is a boutique with a difference, in that, clothing is largely own-label. The proprietors of Disorder design and manufacture all their own-label clothing in Birmingham, using British fabrics and all prints are original artworks, designed in-house. The signature is an Italian tailored cut, with oriental styling, and a British twist; giving Disorder an inconceivable edge that is exported around the world. Such a step away from the mass-production model that everything remains strictly limited edition.

The founders of Disorder aren’t afraid about keeping it personal to them, clinging tightly to the belief that if you build it, they will come – they go as far as to reference the space as their own “private art installation”. In fact, the husband and wife team have held tight to their vision since their University days (where they first met). Setting up Disorder after graduating as a place to reflect political ideas, while taking the principles of entrepreneurship from lecture theatre to practice. Above all, the couple sought to put their vision of sustainable design into practice. Let’s remember that this was 1998, pre the ‘Primark Boom’ that was looming right around the corner, and which would provoke a change in consumer mentality and the rise of the slow-fashion movement. In 1998, the ethos to be conscious, ethical and sustainable was (and in many ways still is) ahead of its time.


Owner, Mark Howard, proudly describes Disorder as a safe haven in a chaotic world and takes inspiration from similar paradoxes in the world. Growing up with undiagnosed dyslexia, Mark sought solace in art and design but was too anti-establishment to pursue an art career and met his wife, Thiri, on an Anthropology/Politics degree course. Thiri grew up in Italy and had a similar passion for design, and so these two souls fused together to form a place that is directional in design, conscious of its supply chain, and kind to its customers. A space that is so unique that Mary Portas, brand consultant to the Government and Apple, has deemed it as one of the “cleverest” and “best” shop brands she has seen in years. It’s important to communities that such spaces exist, providing a shopping experience that fulfils the owner’s passion and drive while meeting (nay, succeeding) the needs of the customer. It’s a co-dependent relationship and one that each party need to foster and support, as Mark states “as long as there are brave, creative people in the city, there will be independents. But without the amazing support we get from our customers we would not exist.” Boutiques teach the community important lessons about achieving dreams and breaking the mould; we simply need to open our eyes and walk in. And when you do. . . .be brave, push the boundaries that define your usual apparel shop, submerge yourself in someone’s dream and see how richer a sense of heritage makes your shopping experience. Here are OneChicMom’s favourite picks (also available online):

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Disorder S/S 2016

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 11 February 2016 13:07:33 Europe/London

Disorder S/S 2016 Collection; Don't Pigeon Hole Me

Disorder Explorer Jacket

One of the things we don't do at Disorder is 'Type' or pigeonhole people, When first asked to write a piece about the new menswear range I immediately thought Lifestyle descriptions; then promptly slapped my own wrist. Lifestyle prompts and promotes limitations on Age, Social circles, body shape etc. And we are having none of that. Truth is, the new menswear collection is for an every-man kind of guy (or girl!) dependent on your mood or the occasion.

First up, the 'Explorer' Jacket; This comes in two variations - Based on a traditional men's suit jacket, One has a green stitch detail running down the torso with a waxed linen detail on the collar. The other has the linen detail following down the length of the jacket with a buckle fasten at the neck. Both have the special detail of extra length on the back 'vent' of the jacket and the faux leather pocket detail. These are a smart/ casual jacket for most occasions, a signature piece that an outfit can be based around.

Disorder Explorer Jacket

The waistcoat; next we have the versatilile Disorder Tank top that transforms in a waistcoat.

Disorder tank top/ waistcoat

The Disorder Parka; A full length parka which is futuristic in the respect that it's light years away from the traditional MOD Fishtail. Though still longer at the back with tailored cutaway detail. Faux leather strap line detail and pockets, orange zipper and a huge hood which gives it an Urban coolness. Fleece lined for extra warmth.

Disorder Parka


'V' Jacket. A casual bomber jacket in length with alternate colored sections with a collarless collar. Buttons from neck to torso then splits into an inverted 'V' shape down to the waist. It's very much a club casual look.

Disorder Military Jacket

Similarly, the new 'Military' Jacket is waist length but buttons fully at a slant from waist to the right on the collar. front panels are differing shades of Olive/green to give it a two dimensional feel. The coloring also takes the formal edge off the style as military styles are often made in black wools.


Disorder Trench Coat

The classic Disorder Trench coat The variations for this cut and style are endless it seems. Up until now it has usually been made from Wool based fabrics with luxurious linings. Formally in Black, Beige 'fur' style and the reversible black and white / grey check, we now see this lighter weight coat which is also reversible for the new spring season in two shades of Olive green. Unlined and giving two very different looks in one garment, it can be worn casually as well as 'Smart'. The full range is now available at Disorder Boutique. Pop in to see us for a try on or fitting. Unique to Disorder with the usual high quality tailoring and not available anywhere else. Burbo 2016

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Its all about the Wool; Burbo interviews Milliefiori about her creations.

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 14 January 2016 13:02:39 Europe/London

Its all about the Wool; Burbo interviews Milliefiori about her creations.

Milliefiori wool cardigan

 

At Disorder we always look to encourage, inspire and nurture local talent where we can, one such talent is Milliefiori, whom Disorder have been working with for a number of years. British Textile Designer, Viv Hew of Milliefiori, speaks frankly to Burbo about her obsession for creating beautiful items of clothing, working with Disorder and what the future has in store?

Milliefiori wool cardigan

 

1. All artists have a material or fabric they're drawn to. Why Wool? I used wool for my current collection , for ‘ Disorder Boutique ’ , because I like that it’s natural, that it’s versatile, that it comes in many forms , each having different yarn properties, that it holds its’ shape and appearance, is durable ,hardwearing and I can source it locally, from a UK wool supplier. I appreciate the regular patterns, symmetry, and colour combinations associated with conventional knitted clothes, but I enjoy a hint of subversion in my designs with ‘deliberate mistakes ’, asymmetries, and bold colours.

Milliefiori wool cardigan

Q2. Where did it all begin for you with design and where did you learn your craft. When I was a young child I peeped into a paper bag. It contained a piece of bright blue cotton fabric. My mother cast a spell and, the next day; this cloth was delivered to me, as a beautiful, blue dress. The ‘magical’ transformation from cloth to dress had a direct bearing on my passion, (nay obsession), for textiles, clothing and creating things, today. I have the same thrill when the strands of wool on the cones, are turned into knitted fabric on the knitting machine, and later into sculptural felted pieces, that are used as raw materials to construct a unique item of clothing. I went on to do a City and Guilds in Stitched textiles, for which I was awarded the highly -prized national Certificate of Merit, and in the same year, I was a finalist in the Charles Henry Foyle Trust Award, for Stitched Textiles. Inspired by my experience of City and Guilds, I enrolled on a Textile Design Degree, (at Birmingham Institute of Art and Design (BIAD), in 2007, and was awarded the Louisa Ann Ryland Award, for my degree assignment coursework. BIAD instilled in me, an enquiring, playful approach to textile methodology and materials that I have carried forward into my practice.

Milliefiori wool cardigan

 

Q3. Where do you begin when designing and making and what is the process? My inspiration comes in many different ways. Sometimes it’s triggered by a word, phrase, narrative, colour, pattern, or image. I develop my ideas through drawing, photographs, or fabric manipulations until it is ready to be developed and refined on the computer. When l am reasonably happy with the result, I create a digital knitwear pattern to send to my knitting machine. Copious sampling is vital, (particularly with knitted felted garments), to ensure correct sizing. The knitted pieces have to be twice the actual size, to allow for fabric shrinkage. My Brother knitting machine is my creative friend. Sometimes it is moody and petulant; at other times we zip along together nicely in the workroom, till the early hours, with music at full blast. The construction process does not move smoothly in a linear fashion .I will change the needle selection manually , to alter the pattern ,or go back onto the computer, to add or delete elements of the design, if I think it improves its’ appearance . Once done, the knitting is removed from the knitting machine for felting. I felt by hand, so that I can control the degree and placement of shrinkage and thereby manipulate the surface, to create interesting surface textures. The fabric is now ready to be assembled. Generally I hand stitch because it gives a neat, flat, strong seam .Once it is stitched together I review the garment and , if I think it beneficial, I will add additional stitching ,and felting , to enhance the shape or structure of the surface . The process can take several weeks, or months, for a complex or large item.

milliefiori mens hat

Q4 .Do you have a favourite piece or repeated design and why? I became interested in the internal decorations at Soho House, (Matthew Bolton’s home in Handsworth ), when I did a project there two years ago. I used a distinctive floor tile motif as the starting point for several of my designs, but, if you put them side by side, you would probably say , they bear little resemblance to one another. Each time I revisit a design, I vary the pattern sequences, yarn types /combinations, and colours so that no two items are the same. Each one is distinctive and unique.

Q5. What are you working on at the moment? With the predicted cold spot I am working on a collection of hand knitted, chunky, hooded snoods, and gloves, manipulated fabric woollen hats, and wraps, to warm and cheer customers on these gloomy wintry days. I am also collaborating with the Thiri Myat designer of Disorder Boutique, to produce a range of fine knitwear panels, to be applied to their garments. Q6. What's in the future for you and Milliefiori? Most of my collection is based around the autumn and winter months .I will be creating a collection more suited to the warmer weather from lighter fabrics, including silks, cottons and some manmade materials.

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Disorder shoot with Mr Birmingham, featured in Vogue

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Sunday, 27 December 2015 13:51:38 Europe/London

Shooting for Disorder Boutique!

by  Joshua Williams

I recently had one of my favourite shoots of all time working alongside the immensely talented Juliet Pea wearing an array of clothing from Birmingham's Independent Retailer of the year Disorder Boutique! Disorder Boutique are one of the most unique stores I've ever seen with some beautiful clothing and it was a pleasure to work once again with Juliet. For the shoot, we travelled to, what I can only describe as, the most beautiful country manor I've ever seen in Telford with a long garden that spanned into mazes, a canal structure and roman columns and archways. For a photo-shoot it was a perfect location! As well as being able to shoot for this amazing brand in such a wonderful location, the photos were not only shared online but two were featured again in Vogue Italia at Vogue.IT and a selection was published in the international Feroce Magazine where they featured me as their 'Model Of The Moment'! The response myself and the team have had from the photos has been amazing and I'm so excited to share the photos with you!  

Joshua Williams, Mr Birmingham!                                                      

    

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Mr Birmingham on Midlands Fashion Week and Disorder Boutique

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 29 October 2015 13:28:24 Europe/London

Mr Birmingham; on Midlands Fashion Week and Disorder Boutique

by Joshua Williams, the current Mr Birmirmingham

16/10/2015Joshu Williams, Mr Birmingham in the Disorder catwalk show

I was recently given the wonderful opportunity of hosting Midlands Fashion Week 2015! At first I must admit I was a bit worried as, other than my own fashion show, I had never hosted such a large event. Having walked in the event at it's previous edition, I was terrified but excited to be able to play such a prominent role in it from the opposite side

Catwalk models and Disorder designer lines up for Midlands Fashon Awards

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The night showcased several designers ranging from Arabic inspired to our very own Kiss Me Kate and each were spectacular in their own right. Despite a few malfunctions and a few silences where I had to entertain the guests with my 'comedic approach', the show was a huge success and everyone involved performed incredibly. It was a brilliant night and I was so glad that I got to share it with all of those involved!

 

As well as the show, it was great to be able to catch up with my fantastic sponsors over at Disorder Boutique. Having kindly taking part in the show at the last minute, the brand was definitely one that stood out from the crowd. The crisp-cut designs and intricate tailoring makes it something completely different to any other alternative male designer.

 

After first meeting the Disorder brand at the Midlands Fashion Awards pre-show, they have now become great friends of mine and I am very happy to be able to work alongside them. I am very excited to be wearing some of their designs over coming events as well as shooting an editorial for them with my good friend Juliet Pea very soon. For those of you that love unique garments hand crafter to perfection, https://www.disorderboutique.com/ is the store for you! Mr Birmingham!

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Mr Birmingham on Midlands Fashion Week and Disorder Boutique

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 29 October 2015 13:27:20 Europe/London

Mr Birmingham on Midlands Fashion Week and Disorder Boutique

by Joshua Williams, the current Mr Birmirmingham

16/10/2015

Picture

I was recently given the wonderful opportunity of hosting Midlands Fashion Week 2015! At first I must admit I was a bit worried as, other than my own fashion show, I had never hosted such a large event. Having walked in the event at it's previous edition, I was terrified but excited to be able to play such a prominent role in it from the opposite side.

 

The night showcased several designers ranging from Arabic inspired to our very own Kiss Me Kate and each were spectacular in their own right. Despite a few malfunctions and a few silences where I had to entertain the guests with my 'comedic approach', the show was a huge success and everyone involved performed incredibly. It was a brilliant night and I was so glad that I got to share it with all of those involved!

Picture

As well as the show, it was great to be able to catch up with my fantastic sponsors over at Disorder Boutique. Having kindly taking part in the show at the last minute, the brand was definitely one that stood out from the crowd. The crisp-cut designs and intricate tailoring makes it something completely different to any other alternative male designer.

 

After first meeting the Disorder brand at the Midlands Fashion Awards pre-show, they have now become great friends of mine and I am very happy to be able to work alongside them. I am very excited to be wearing some of their designs over coming events as well as shooting an editorial for them with my good friend Juliet Pea very soon. For those of you that love unique garments hand crafter to perfection, https://www.disorderboutique.com/ is the store for you! Mr Birmingham!

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Style Birmingham Live 2015

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Tuesday, 27 October 2015 17:32:55 Europe/London

Disorder Steal the show at Style Birmingham Live Catwalk Show 2015

 

The event featured six catwalk shows across the weekend – all hosted by Mark Wright – as well as fashion advice from style experts. Everyone that turned out were all treated like VIP's, as champagne flowed the stand out show had to be Disorder , stunningly choreographed to 'In between' by The Ultraviolets (Push Button Monkeys Remix) Disorder's collection stole the show.

Disorder Couture Womens Reversable Jacket

 

 


 

A host of Birmingham’s prestigious retailers lined up for this year’s Style Birmingham Live, joined TV presenter, Mark Wright and Stylist, Mark Heyes for an unmissable weekend of fashion, beauty and shopping.

The city’s fashion and shopping event of the year, Style Birmingham Live is took place on Saturday 26th and Sunday 27th September at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery’s Gas Hall, which was transformed into ‘The Fashion Theatre’ for the event.

This year, Style Birmingham Live partnered up with award-winning hair salon, Francesco Group, who revealed their top hair styling tips and demonstrated current trends on the catwalk throughout the weekend.

Along with Disorder a range of retailers lined up for this year’s event and showcased their latest autumn/winter styles and collections. These included John Lewis, Jigsaw, Marks & Spencer, House of Fraser, Moss Bros, Hawes & Curtis and award-winning retailers Liquor Store and Disorder. Retailers from Bullring also presented their latest styles including Cos, Radley, Warehouse, Coast, Reiss, Karen Millen, New Look, Jones Bootmaker, Debenhams and Michelle Keegan’s new Lipsy collection. The event featured six catwalk shows across the weekend – all hosted by Mark Wright – as well as fashion advice from style experts. Everyone that turned out were all treated like VIP's, as champagne flowed the stand out show had to be Disorder , stunningly choreographed to 'In between' by The Ultraviolets (Push Button Monkeys Remix) Disorder's collection stole the show.

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Disorder Catwalk Show AW 2015

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Friday, 16 October 2015 18:05:21 Europe/London

Disorder's New Couture Collection, Steals the Show

Disorder Couture Hooded, Reversable  Kimono Dress/Coat on Style Bimingham Catwalk2105

 

Disorder is an award winning fashion brand and men’s/women’s fashion boutique based in Birmingham City Centre, just off New Street.Established in 1998, Disorder design, manufacture and retails their own brand in the Award winning Disorder Boutique.

Disorder hand tailors their our own clothing in Birmingham, using British fabrics, exporting around world. Disorder is a fashion forward Directional Clothing Brand, it signature style is an Italian Tailored Cut, with Oriental Styling, and a British Twist; which gives Disorder an inconceivable edge. We print our original paintings and artwork onto fabrics for lining our suits, waistcoats and making into apparel. Everything we make is limited edition, and produced to the highest ethical standards, in the city itself. We also, stock, up and coming British Designers, such as Burbo K’ture, exclusively in the shop.

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Nathanial Valentino spotted on Young, Free and Single wearing Disorder

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Friday, 16 October 2015 17:50:48 Europe/London

Disorder spotted on Channel 4's Young, Free and Single

 

The question on everyones lips, apart from the obvious, is where are Nathanial's cloths are from. Who designed them? and where can you get them?

Well I can spill the beans, the Fur Trench coat Nathanial wore on his first date was from Disorder Brand, and is stocked in their own boutique, in Birmingham City Centre. The limited edition fur coats are all designed by Disorder and then individually hand crafted by Disorder's own in house tailors in their own studio, in Birmingham, England.... No Mass production here! Everything designed by Disorder is limited edition, with a run of 10 pieces for the coats and maybe 50 for the shirts, guaranteeing the highest quality and unique garments, for those of you who care about those things.      

Nathanial Valentino appears on Channel Fours, Young Free and Single, wearing Disorder Fur Trench Coat.

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A Coat of Two Sides.

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Thursday, 8 October 2015 14:09:37 Europe/London

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Disorder Spotted at London Fashion Week

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Sunday, 14 June 2015 16:44:30 Europe/London

Artist Tim Victor was spotted at this season A/W15 London Fashion Week wearing our formal dusty brown pea coat from Disorder.

Styled with a crisp white shirt and a pair of burnt orange chinos he effortlessly looked sophisticated. The colour palette brought forth a contrast of earth tones which complimented the hue of the coat. This coat is simple yet affective. Perfect for the transitioning weather and can be worn with a variety of colours. Available in sizes S,M, L, XXL.

Formal Dusty Brown Pea Coat by Disorder

Get this look at www.menswearstyle.co.uk/streetstyle and purchase this timeless staple coat from Disorder Boutique. Stylist and Fashion Blogger Anne-Mariealso seen at this season A/W15 London Fashion Week wearing Disorder by Burbo K’ture. A timeless print of tartan was displayed as she wore this tunic wrap dress. Styled with black accessories this dress was certainly THE statement piece. This dressed is an original piece. It is uniquely made and has a simplistic detail that enables varied looks. The belt provides room for the dress to be cinched in, as it can be wrapped countless times around the waist. It also leaves room to be worn loosely for a punk rock look, styled with a pair of Dr Martens. Get this look at @shopatellescloset on Instagram and purchase this one of a kind dress at Disorder Boutique.

 

Formal Dusty Brown Pea Coat by Disorder

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Versatility is Key

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Sunday, 14 June 2015 15:18:00 Europe/London

Versatility is Key. by Burbo 2015

"Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing" Oscar Wilde must have had a crystal ball, especially when it comes to Fashion.

Where can I find menswear fashion that is different? Where can I find unique womenswear?

Disorder Reversible Womens Hooded Jacket

Everyone loves a bargain, dont they? it's become a test of 'Shopper Savvy' - How much? Where from? Did you get a discount? They are the usual questions asked when we wear something new. When was the last time you were asked 'What type of fabric is that?', 'Did you have that custom made?' Or comments like, 'I love the way that fits / drapes on you'. Rarely I'd bet. I do go into high street clothing stores; it's good research. Not so much for the actual clothing itself, generic fast fashion is not my thing. I like to listen to what people say and watch how they handle and look at the clothes. They may as well be buying a loaf of bread.

How to be a savvy shopper, buy a Womens Reversible Hooded Coat By Disorder, stocked exclusively at Disorder Boutique.

 Womens Reversible Hooded Coat by Disorder

Reversible Womens Hooded coat by Disorder

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Disorder Shoot with Scott Adams

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Friday, 12 June 2015 14:26:03 Europe/London

New photo shoot from Disorder; Mens Directional Clothing Brand #Disorder #DisorderBoutique @DisorderBrand model #ScottAdams. The trousers were recently featured in a music video by #Akala. All of Disorders designs are manufactured ethically in Britain. Disorder/ Disorder Boutique was recently awarded Best Emerging Brand by #BirminghamMadeMe, and recieving an Oustanding customer service award voted for by the Public, from #RetailBirmigham. Disorder has won many retailing and design awards, most notably the #MaryPortas Best Independent Award #BestBirminghamIndependent.

 

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State of Independence-Fashion is Dead?

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Tuesday, 7 April 2015 13:12:01 Europe/London

State of Independence - Fashion is Dead? 

by Burbo KtureDisorder Plaid Winter Coat

I've re-written this piece several times because it sounded too preachy. Like a reformed smoker I guess, but the sentiment is the same.

I'm a reformed 'shopper'. Yes, when the mood takes me I can shop, and I'm one of those annoying types that has bargains throwing themselves off the shelves and into my possession. "How much??!!" my friends cry. *smug grin* I'd buy pretty much 'in bulk' at one time and talk myself into the fact if I didn't like it when I got home I could always customise it. Cue clothes lying in cupboards and drawers unworn, Consume consume consume. I think its genetic. When my Grandmother goes to the shops she can spend three hours wandering around, and if nothing takes her fancy, she buys....... new tea towels! I think it's to convince herself it wasn't a wasted journey.

So, I used to shop on the highstreet and still wear the same things over and over again on a daily basis but HAD TO have something new if I was going out at the weekend. But thats not 'Fashion' or 'Style' is it? Then I started to make, or rather unmake. I first started designing clothes by way of customising, this was way before the whole vintage upcycle trend started and I did it out of necessity - I'm quite short but I have a long torso and quite broad shoulders, i was finding it more and more difficult to find clothes on the highstreet which didn't make me look like medallion man squeezing into a shirt too small, or a twelve year old boy wearing his dads suit. Along with the generic styling of high street 'Fashion', the sizes also started to become more generic as in S/M/L/XL/XXL How many times have I asked a shop assistant

"What collar size is a medium shirt?" only to get a blank expression. So I started to unpick, tear apart, deconstruct and put back together, in my size and the way I wanted a piece to sit on my body. This taught me an awful lot of respect for design, tailoring, structure and the finish on a piece of clothing. - At this point I have to hold my hands up and say, yes I am that man in Selfridges who turns all the dresses inside out and fiddles with the turn ups on the trousers on the mannequins; I just like to work out how things are made! Sorry. But this is how I learned to make clothes, and because I am 'self taught' I learn something new all the time, and I love it!

I recently read an article that was tagged 'Fashion is Dead'. It initially attracted me as I used that term as one of the tag lines for my Tee Shirts when I first started Hand printing them. The article was an interview with Li Edelkoort who is a trend forecaster for the big fashion labels. She is warning that the bubble is about to burst on the Fashion industry as we know it, not just from the top down but from the bottom up too. The big players in fashion are spinning out of control and putting more and more pressure on themselves and respectively on to the consumer: Couture, Diffusion lines, resort collections, pre season collections, fragrance, accessories, bags, home furnishings. Whats next? Toilet roll? They do all of this simply as a spin off because the irony is, they are not selling enough clothes. They also have such immense budget power for marketing that newer and smaller labels don't get a look in on editorial in fashion magazines as the editorial is all tied up with how much is spent on advertising.

Similarly the cheap end of the market has become SO cheap that clothes have become disposable items. An item you are wearing right now could actually have cost less than you spend on coffee in one day, isnt that scary? And there's SO much of it. And isn't it scary that the person who stitched that T-shirt you are wearing probably doesn't make the price of a cup of coffee a day?

Ms. Edelkoort is predicting that clothes are going to make a comeback, that the Fashion houses are hanging on to an archaic trend and business model that started in the1950s. Consumers are not interested in 'Fashion' anymore; they like the pretty pictures but Fashion is just a by-product for celebrity and wealth. Young consumers and the stylish are creating their own wardrobe and they're own look due to the explosion of the mighty Fashion Blogger. In the future I'm told there will be more renting, sharing and borrowing of clothing and an emphasis on craft and bespoke, unique design. I recently read a piece on a group who call themselves RUDE girl, from Australia. They literally trawl through landfill and find handmade, bespoke and couture clothing!! They then mix it with pieces they already have and, hey! A new look, for relatively nothing.

Theres a similar thing happening in the music business. No one makes money from releasing music anymore, file sharing sites and product endorsement and live shows are where the money is at. Again, it's moving more towards the experience rather than the ownership. Notice how many artists 'guest' on other peoples records? The new business model for fashion or clothing will see more collaboration, group working, labels where there are a handful of designers as a label community. So where does this leave the big, high end labels?

Ms. Edelkoort believes there will be a return to couture on a small scale and labels will make money by licensing patterns to high street chains.

This will solve the problem of 'Fast Fashion': Items would have to be reproduced in near to the same fabrics and by skilled cutters and machinists. Good news for Skills and Education. Good news for quality fabric producers.

The price of clothing would rise to reflect this and so people would buy less and buy more carefully: Good news for the environment. They may also have more respect for, and take care of their clothing more.

The younger generation of designers are taking a stand on this too, Meadham Kirchhoff recently stated they would no longer be taking part in London Fashion week and there was speculation as to whether there would be any more collections from them. Why? Because the sponsorship ran out. They have been the great new hope for British Fashion for a few years now, gaining massive support from more underground magazines. They don't make commercial fashion but had been seduced on to the Fashion treadmill - That costs money, a lot of money. Staging shows, Samples production and fulfilling orders. all that for a 'brand' that does not mass produce cheaply enough to make a big buck. They are now calling for a 'Revolution' in Fashion, a way to rethink the whole 'system' of how things are done.

I find myself in the curious position of being in step with this tide change. As a designer with a tiny little label, I don't want to become 'Global' I don't want a string of boutiques and a fragrance line, and I certainly dont want to be in commercials selling laxative yoghurts, Gok, when what I set out to be was a creative designer. I want to remain independent and in control of my own work rather than being dictated to for the sake of shareholders. Obviously I want to build my labels' reputation and sales - just not at the expense of creativity, independence and individuality. Too many people starting businesses today have bought into this myth (lie), that a business has to grow as big and as quickly as possible. Politicians talk of this 'Global Race'. Race for what?? I ask. Money? Power? Its the law of gravity and the way of the world that what goes up must come down. It all sounds a bit 'Quick buck' to me, and at the cost of reputation, quality and the true artistry of making clothes.

So if Fashion is dead, or dying as we know it, and the emphasis is on personal style and real quality clothing, does that mean in the future we will all have our own personal stylist/shopper at our disposal?

God knows, there's enough of them. Or will we just trust our own instinct and fashion palette and create a new movement of uber stylish individuals........I won't hold my breath on that count. Consumers have been force fed tatt and rubbish and brainwashed by marketing for so long, it's going to take a while to wipe the slate clean, to re-educate. And as for me, I'll just keep doing what I'm doing, piece by piece, wait for the world to catch up and spread my #newagenda to anyone who'll wear it.

Happy Shopping! Burbo K'ture 2015 www.burbokture.net

#fashionisdead #burbo #fashionindustry #fastfashion #fashionmerchandise #LiEdelkoort #BritishFashion #Globalfashionbrands #MeadhamKirchhoff #disorderboutique #independentfashion #independentdesigners #Birminghamfashion #Birminghamstyle

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Just a Number

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Tuesday, 10 February 2015 22:40:38 Europe/London

Just a Number?

Disorder style by Burbo

I recently read somewhere that " No-one under 30 should work in the fashion industry." the text was in relation to fashion mostly being for and featuring 'youth' imagery.

I initially felt a huge wave of agreement. Antagonistic? Possibly, but only as antagonistic as people int there 30s and 40s being bombarded with images through the media of impossibly 'beautiful', younger and younger looking models, to sell just about anything but stairlifts and denture glue. The standard to which photo and video images are set, styled and tweaked etc makes the end product a new art form and an almost impossible to attain standard in real life. But then even this area of 'controversy' is SO five years ago, along with plus size models and gender neutral clothing.....*yawn*. ..

.But on reflection.

It's true a lot of young people want to work in Fashion, it's true a lot of them haven't got a clue; A degree in pattern cutting, choosing your friends bridesmaids dresses or constantly being told by your friends you look 'Hot' does not make you a fashion designer or a stylist. It takes many years of experimentation, experience and MISTAKES to finally be worthy of those job titles. AND ACTUALLY IT'S OUR FAULT.

Yes us, the over 40s. We lived through Punk, The 80s Pop video explosion and Rave / dance culture in the 90s. Everything that is being referenced, plagiarized and regurgitated now, WE lived through it as it happened; So.... we do it best. Add on to that advancements in technology in areas like photography and videography and WHOOOOSH!!!! We're away; Fashion heaven.

But nothing 'new' has happened for years. All the high street stores and many of the high end catwalk shows are referencing punk, hippie, disco and '80s vintage' - Bore off! All of those movements and times were about experimenting, creating your own look and MAKING something. D.I.Y. So instead of trying to create anything new we now get terms like 'Hipster' and 'Normcore' *shudder*, celebrating the 'ordinariness' of a look. Pop stars look like they work at the local supermarket!!! Where are the STARS?? Most 20 year olds I meet are far more conservative dressers than most 40-50yr olds I know. Theres too much peer pressure, the kids are all watching each other, They are 'on' 24-7, so theres no room for mistakes or faux pas. And it makes them really boring people. This worries me. No one is creating from the street up, which is where great fashion historically has always come from.

http://youtu.be/9Yy_0HsIZsk

SO, WHY SHOULD IT MATTER? Why should it matter that people over 30 are represented in the nuts and bolts workings and the glossy end result of fashion? We have an aging population. Retirement age is creeping up higher and higher. The job market will be getting older in relation to recruiting. Which is good news for someone who is sick of the industry they work in at 50 and decide to start their own business or change careers for the next 20 years. That's brilliant but the rub lies when the person interviewing you for said career may be 30 years your junior. and may be a teeny bit prejudiced because they think that people over 40 just curl up in front of the fire watching gardening programmes. People in their 40s AND 50s more and more need to appear relevant and vital. It's not about wrinkles. it's about being healthy, useful, contemporary.

Progress is being made. larger design houses like Yves Saint Laurent, Céline and Vivienne Westwood are using older and even elderly models in campaigns. But these fashion giants are playing catch up after years of following the media line of selling to only the young, thats where I have admiration for working at Disorder. They have, particularly with menswear, grown and matured with their customer base and that customer has remained loyal. Also, Photographer Ari Seth Cohen began his blog and a small revolution, 'Advanced Style' which is now a film and my favorite quote is: " I never wanted to look young, I just wanted to look great" Check it out Grandma! So any 20 something fashionistas reading this, remember: it has to be worked at, it has to be earned.

Burbo 2015 www.burbokture.net 

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Where is Sustainable Fashion heading in 2015?

0 Comments | Posted in Latest News from Disorder By Mark Howard

Sunday, 1 February 2015 18:40:05 Europe/London

Where is Sustainable fashion heading in 2015? Hand woven cardigan/scarf for Disorder

Photography by Dart Photography

In the face of both triumph and tragedy, fashion’s masked and intricate supply chain is becoming more transparent. So where is the industry headed in 2015?

I never ever dreamed I would find myself working in the fashion industry. But never say never right? And somewhere between scraping plates for food waste studies and being shoulder deep in a cow’s rumen for ecological restoration research, a lot changed.

Fashion was always an interest of mine, surely an influence from my Parisian mother and catty American high school upbringing, but I always saw the industry as vain–only meant for those that have too much time and money on their hands to care about anything else other than what they wore. For my future, I wanted to be part of something meaningful. So I turned my career efforts to the world of sustainable business. Yet eventually, my environmental blindness led me directly into a relationship I soon wouldn’t be able to untangle.

Unless you are a staunch nudist you consume fashion. As utopian as it might seem to some, few of us are nudists, and so it comes as no surprise that fashion stands as the third largest industry in the entire world, after only energy and food. And like the latter two, consumers want it cheap and fast.

But to churn out fast and cheap in a complicated global supply chain, means processes need to be slimmed, quality diminished and externalities bleeding out at all steps. For fashion, this manifests in thinner, less durable fabric, miniscule pay for workers and over-consumption by us. From growing and harvesting the fiber, to processing and dyeing the textiles, to designing, cutting and sewing the garment, endless resources–be it land or creativity–go into clothing. A lot more than a $5 price tag will ever tell you.

I recently heard ethical fashion pioneer, Elizabeth Cline, speak on her first eye opening experience, when she realized there was something amiss in the industry. In the introduction of her book, “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion”, she remembers how she found herself in a Manhattan K-Mart buying seven pairs of the same shoes because they were marked down from $15 to $7. “What was so interesting about the psychology of that [moment],” says Cline, “is I owned more clothing than anything else, and I knew the least about it out of anything I buy. And I probably cared the least about it. I didn’t consider myself into fashion, yet I owned so much.”

We live in an era of conscious consumerism and yet at large a void still exits between an eco-lifestyle and the clothing we wear.

Our desire for cheap, fast clothing pushed manufacturing out of the United States fast and hard. The heartbreaking estimations that 80 percent of apparel manufacturing jobs were lost in the last twenty years is real and clearly seen in those communities with factories left. On top of the shift to overseas production for the race to the bottom dollar, cut throat, almost impossible deadlines place inhumane pressures on factory workers. So where do we go from here?

The word sustainability is thrown around a lot, and really turns some people off. And I don’t blame them. What is sustainability? No one really knows exactly what it is, or even if we can achieve it. But we know for certain what sustainability isn’t. Sustainability isn’t having more than we need. But how can we know when owning too much clothing is too much?

“Can we actually make sustainable clothing–I mean, really sustainable clothing?,” posed Rhett Godfrey, Sustainability Director of the progressive organic cotton clothing company Loomstate, at the Manufacture New York Sustainable Textile Summit this past November. ”It’s one thing using dyes which don’t require water or saving energy or having fair trade and so forth. But at the and of the day are we being sustainable in terms of a systems-thinking, sustainability in term of true ecosystem–in terms of supporting peoples traditional skills and supporting cultures and communities.”

Appreciating the intricate and skilled process of making clothing is vital to make informed decision as wearers. It’s looking beyond a label or tactical marketing campaign. For example, looking beyond just buying organic cotton or made in the U.S.–although these are great clues to guide consumers on how to shop better–it’s a whole system approach, and not it’s individual parts. Aristotle and Wendell Berry know “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”

But there is no right or wrong way. Every designer and fashion house approaches the making process differently from the time an idea forms to the process of production. And it’s an ethical process we are seeking. It’s a spectrum of ethics and you need to decide yours to develop a more meaningful attachment to clothing again.

The heart of the issue is it’s about time we start building a fulfillingrelationship again with our clothing. But can we really have a relationship with an inanimate object or is the relationship about the one with ourselves?

For all the tragedy which arose within the fashion industry in 2013, there was so much beauty that opened as well. 2013 saw some amazing steps for a more ethical fashion community. Like Nike’s Maker app geared toward designers that beautifully visualized the resource consumption of different textiles. Bib + Tuck, an online site to swap clothing. And Zady, an e-commerce platform dedicated to telling the story of the makers.

Fashion allows us to express our identity and put forth a sense of self. And through what I’ve seen, we are developing a new passion for clothing. Not one that is based on greed and vanity but one reflecting of values, quality and character–a new type of luxury. Clothing is damn hard to make and people are connecting with the beauty and craft of that process, just like we saw with food. “And that is what is so excited to me, clothing is amazing.. and the more you now about them, the more you know about how they are sourced, and the more fulfilling your relationship with them is,” says Cline.

What I had to realize about fashion, and where I think we are heading, is understanding the complexity of our clothing.

“It is about having personal relationships, it is about having transparency, and involvement of your supply chains,” says Godfrey.

So where is sustainable fashion heading in 2014? First, it is knowing there is no difference between sustainable fashion and fashion. In the end we are taking about clothing and expressing ourselves. Next, we are getting closer to a stronger relationship with the clothing we wear, and the story of how they are made.

Our loudest vote is our dollar. And 2014 will continue to shift the market as we put our money where our values lay. Nothing is perfect and everything is a process, but education is key to a brighter future. Ethical fashion champion Vivienne Westwood‘s words always ring in my mind “Buy Less. Buy Better. Make it Last.”

Here’s to 2015.

image: Juliette Donatelli

Related on Ecosalon

 4 Sustainable Fashion Films: The Power of Storytelling to Captivate and Convince

Between The Lines: From NYFW to the Garment Factories of Pakistan 

 Popular Fast Fashion Brands Caught Selling Lead-Tainted Purses, Shoes and Accessories

Keep in touch with Juliette on twitter @spadesandsilk

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